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"Mercator 1569" is licensed under CC0 Public Domain (via Wikimedia Commons)

Schools in Boston recently decided to make the switch from the Mercator projection of world maps to the Gall-Peters projection, becoming the first American school system to do so. While seemingly uninteresting, making the switch from the Mercator projection is a step toward inclusivity and one that other schools should consider making.

"Traffic lights" by Vit Brunner is licensed under CC BY-NC-SA 2.0 (via Flickr)

We all hate getting tickets, but would you rather argue your case face to face with a police officer, or receive a letter in the mail weeks after the infraction?

For years, many cities have relied on red light and speed cameras to enforce traffic laws and automatically send out fines to rule breakers. However, recently some cities are questioning the ethics involved. While integrating these cameras is not illegal, some citizens and lawmakers alike fear their usage serves as more of a hidden tax than a safety measure.

"Heiwa elementary school" by ajari is licensed under CC BY 2.0 (via Wikimedia Commons)

Equal opportunity weighs heavily in American views of education. Not everyone can grow up to be a CEO of a Fortune 500 company, but who gets to be CEO should be determined principally by merit, and not according to skin color, place of birth, or family wealth. Both conservatives and liberals describe education as a driver of equal opportunity. While some may be born into poverty and others born into wealth, a well-rounded education can be the leg up that the poor child needs to compete with the rich kids. The moral case for public education rests on its ability to give everyone a shot to rise to the top.

"Eiffel Tower" by nuno_lopes is licensed under CC0 Public Domain (via Pixabay)

In the summer of 2015, a lone gunmen massacred 38 tourists enjoying a sunny beach in Tunisia. Since this incident, many radical terrorists have been targeting tourist destinations for attacks, aiming to deter economic progress in these countries. These countries range from fragile Arab Spring nations attempting to progress economically, like Tunisia and Libya, to longstanding Western tourist destinations like France and Spain. Since tourism is an important part of the global economy, does the average traveler have a moral responsibility to ignore terror threats and continue traveling to potentially dangerous countries?